How to upgrade your grid

A new version of OpenSim was recently released, OpenSim 0.7.4. There’s an upgrade function built into the Diva Distro version of OpenSim and its derivatives, including Sim-on-a-Stick and New World Studio. The updated version of the Diva Distro came out this past Wednesday, and the new Sim-on-a-Stick was released yesterday. (Check out the great getting started video from Ener Hax.)

The updated version of the New World Studio is due out in “some weeks,” said developer Oliver Battini in a Facebook post Monday.

OpenSim server console.

However, for those grids that have set things up from scratch — or have customized their grids — the upgrade process can be significantly more involved.

The steps for upgrading your system probably will be unique to your particular grid in some ways – depending on what items you have customized, your file structure, and so on.

I’m happy to share the steps I follow in case that might be helpful. In general, you should be able to keep all of your additional services and configuration options when you upgrade.

Here’s a quick outline of the steps I follow:

STEP 1. Back up your database and take OAR snapshots of all regions. This is the MOST important step! You want to make sure you can always fully restore your old setup in case something goes terribly awry with the
upgrade.

STEP 2. Download the newest version of OpenSim and unzip to a NEW directory. CAREFULLY read the release notes to make sure you understand any new configuration options or changes to old configuration options before proceeding.

STEP 3. Open the old and new /bin/opensim.ini files side by side and copy settings over by hand, checking carefully line-by-line for new configuration options or changes that need to be made to old configuration options (based on release notes). NEVER just overwrite the new file with the old file – it is best to go through it line-by-line.

STEP 4. Ditto for /bin/robust.HG.ini file. NEVER just overwrite the new file with the old file – it is best to go through it line-by-line.

STEP 5. Ditto for /bin/config-include/gridcommon.ini. NEVER just overwrite the new file with the old file – it is best to go through it line-by-line.

STEP 6. You CAN copy over your regions.ini file from the old to the new.

STEP 7. Download the newest version of Diva Wifi for Robust and follow installation instructions. ALWAYS read the latest release notes and installation instructions before copying over old config information to new
.ini files.

STEP 8. Copy any customized graphics or html files from old Diva Wifi to new Diva Wifi sub-directory.

STEP 9. Download the newest version of any other modules/add-ons you’re using and follow installation instructions. ALWAYS read the latest release notes and installation instructions before copying over old config information to new .ini files.

STEP 10. If you use smart-start and backup scripts, configure for new directory names.

Then cross your fingers, hold your breath, and start everything up.

I have very detailed notes about previous upgrades I’ve done, plus additional info about doing backups and other things at fleep.wikispaces.com/FleepGrid.

You can search for the 2/26/12 entry — it’s about a fifth of the way down the page, if you prefer to scroll — to see step-by-step what I did the last time I upgraded, including copies of my .ini files as examples.

I’ll be upgrading to 0.7.4 this weekend and will have updated notes on the same page soon.

fleep513@gmail.com'

Chris Collins

Chris Collins is a project manager in Instructional and Research Computing at the University of Cincinnati. She is also known as “Fleep Tuque” in-world and is the owner and founder of FleepGrid.

  • Marcus Llewellyn

    When it comes to one’s INI files, using a tool like WinMerge (http://winmerge.org/) can be really handy. A simulator operator can load her old and new INI files side by side, and the program will automatically highlight the differences and can provide a few editing shortcuts.

    There’s some other programs around like this one (I use Meld myself) but WinMerge is cross platform and ready to use for Windows and Linux.

  • “Back up your database and take OAR snapshots of all regions. This is the MOST important step!” Amen! =)

    OpenSim has been so solid over the last year and loss of data is a non-issue for me BUT it is always prudent to backup your work and this is both incumbent on commercial grid operators as well as individuals. if you are able to backup OARs – then do so (our Enclave Harbour backs up each OAR daily plus does and entire SQL db backup daily)

    even my work using sim-on-a-stick to make “things” is accompanied by backups of that work to the stick it is on and onto my main computer and then onto an external hard drive and another stick

    outstanding guidelines from Fleep and a great reminder to keep things simple so that you have less to lose and less to mess up =)

    • Guest

      ” backs
      up each OAR daily plus does and entire SQL db backup daily”

      That’s a bit extreme for most users, unless there’s major changes made frequently there’s no use backing up the same items on a daily basis. I have several regions that pretty much never change at all, their content is static. If someone is occasionally building, I can see taking progressive OAR backups every other day or once a week, some maybe once a month.

  • WesternPrairie

    I don’t bother with backing up the database, they tend to get full of junk, clutter and can become corrupted, I just save the OARs periodically, and everything needed is contained in those.
    I feel it’s better to just start with a new fresh database than continuing to re-use and copy the same database for months, multiple upgrades etc After all, if there’s junk or a corrupt area in the database, backing it up will continue to backup and copy those errors, issues and problems. The OAR is basically a zipped archive, if you unzip it you can see all the folders and files, textures, xml fiels etc etc in there, all readable in plain text editors, if you feel better MAKE a backup of the database just in case, but start with a new one.

  • WesternPrairie

    Upgrades go pretty easy, with the OSgrid version everything is preconfigured and one only needs to copy the regions.ini file and edit 2 files if using mysql, 1 file if using the built-in sqlite.
    I changed my server from openSUSE to Ubuntu as its much easier to use, but as before I’ve run into the same SIGABRT error/crash in one region, a little googling found its related to mono and that reinstalling mono etc etc doesn’t fix the problem.
    It was occasional on openSUSE, but now more frequent, and usually happened when there was nothing at all going on.
    I also noticed my processor use would spike to 100% or more and stay there, and the memory use would go to 6 gb out of the 7.8 gb available and it would crash the one region/instance and display an error about not enough memory available to analize the error and send it to the developers.

    So I googled again and found references and a mantis about the warp3D map tile module reported as causing the memory and processor spike, so I commented out the warp3D map tiles line, restarted and since I did that yesterday I haven’t see the problem.
    with 9 regions and 3 instances of OS/mysql running and my avatar logged in, the monitor shows CPU use is around 10%, memory use is around 1.0gb (14%) and holding steady.
    While upgrading to 1.7.5 and Ubuntu, I ran into two familiar errors I could never remember how I fixed them, one was: [Region name] is not part of an estate, the other was something about an “object is not set to an instance of an object” or some such clueless message that is meaningless, I believe the cause of both is because my mysql connection string’s database name was wrong and didn’t match, it was opensim3 and it should have been opensim, once I changed that connection string to the correct database it started up normally.