Military releases Atropia simulation

The U.S. Army’s Atropia simulation build — all nine regions of it — is now available for anyone to download and install on their own grid.

The work is released under a Creative Commons license that allows people to use the build for any purpose, including commercial, to adapt it and redistribute it, as long as the work is attributed to the original source and shared under the same Creative Commons license.

“In a nutshell, feel free to use the scenarios and modify them to your needs,” said Douglas Maxwell, the science and technology manager for virtual world strategic applications at the U.S. Army Research Lab’s Simulation & Training Technology Center. “Make sure you attribute the ARL and STTC as the source in your documentation and briefings.”

(Image courtesy US Army Research Laboratory Simulation and Training Technology Center.)

(Image courtesy US Army Research Laboratory Simulation and Training Technology Center.)

This is the same build that was used as the location of last summer’s virtual world training simulation.

Atropia is the name of a fictional oil-rich country at war with its neighbor, with US and UN joint coalition forces in place to monitor a cease-fire agreement. The center of the simulation is the town of Brentville, which has a clothing shop, a market, a courthouse, and a mosque.

The Reynolds Tea House in Brentville. (Image courtesy David Winfrey.)

The Reynolds Tea House in Brentville. (Image courtesy David Winfrey.)

 

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Maria Korolov

Maria Korolov is editor and publisher of Hypergrid Business. She has been a journalist for more than twenty years and has worked for the Chicago Tribune, Reuters, and Computerworld and has reported from over a dozen countries, including Russia and China.

  • [sneaks across the border from Brentville and blows up an oil rig, thus ending the ceasefire]

    Seriously, though, thx US Gov and Douglas, for sharing.

  • i think this is kind of like NASA and military photos – since they are paid for with US tax dollars, they are copyright free to use by Americans

    it’s neat to see that this is done as a CC license and shows a more global acknowledgemnet of the world

  • Hannah

    This is seriously neat; I’m going to have to play with it!