Pirate’s Atoll grid moves to DigiWorldz

Pirates Atoll. (Image courtesy Pirate's Atoll.)

Pirates Atoll. (Image courtesy Pirate’s Atoll.)

Pirate’s Atoll announced today that the grid is moving to DigiWorldz.

The Atoll has been a small, hypergrid-enabled standalone minigrid hosted with Oliveira Virtual Lands.

Grid owner John Simmons, also known as Strannik Zipper in-world, said that he decided to move the grid to be closer to DigiWorldz’ music scene, to take advantage of the grid’s currency, for its low land prices, and round-the-clock monitoring.

Simmons said that he still recommends Oliveira for anyone looking to rent regions on an open grid such as OSgrid, but “Fernando Oliveira probably did a lot more work than he bargained for in keeping up with the demands of a busy standalone.”

Since the spring of 2012, Pirate’s Atoll has had four regions, and a maximum of just six registered users. It is best known for having hosted a party during the 2014 OpenSimulator Community Conference, when 107 visitors came to the grid.

Since then, the grid has also been a stop on hypergrid tours, with a typical month seeing between 15 and 30 visitors.

Now, Simmons said, he plans to take advantage of DigiWorldz’ variable-sized regions. Currently, a single varregion that holds up to 15,000 prims and can be configured to be the size of up to 16 standard regions is just $16 a month. Each additional 5,000 prims costs about $5 per month extra.

Prices will be going up on October 1, and are expected to be $20 for a 15,000-prim varregion. Customers who order before then can get current rates grandfathered in.

“I now have some expansion room for a surfing or sailing zone,” Simmons said. “Plus room to add things such as a honky tong and some larger buildings.”

Simmons said that he plans to hold a grand opening party soon, but that visitors can already stop by. The hypergrid teleport address is login.digiworldz.com:8002:Pirates Atoll.

maria@hypergridbusiness.com'

Maria Korolov

Maria Korolov is editor and publisher of Hypergrid Business. She has been a journalist for more than twenty years and has worked for the Chicago Tribune, Reuters, and Computerworld and has reported from over a dozen countries, including Russia and China.