Homido Mini is a super small VR headset

The world’s smallest virtual reality headset has arrived.

The Homido Mini weighs half an ounce, and fits into the palm of your hand.

A folded Homido Mini next to my Samsung Galaxy S6.

A folded Homido Mini next to my iPhone 5S.

When you fold it out it looks like a tiny pair of glasses attached to a plastic clip.

Unfolded Homido Mini next to a regular Sharpie pen.

Unfolded Homido Mini next to a regular Sharpie pen.

The clip goes over your smartphone, like this.

Homido Mini attached to smartphone.

Homido Mini attached to iPhone 5S in a protective case.

It does work. And it does make it easy to switch apps, because the screen is right there. And for folks who get claustrophobic wearing regular headsets, there’s no loss of peripheral vision here.

However, you obviously have to hold it — no headstrap here. And it doesn’t come with a case, so if you plan to carry it around, get a small bag or case of some kind to put it in.

It can also slide around. I frequently had to move my head back to re-center the device on my smartphone.

You can get it for 15 Euros from the company itself. After converting to dollars, and paying for shipping, it wound up costing me $30.

Or you can do the smart thing and order it from Amazon for $15.

It comes with a tiny little booklet, and a tiny little QR Code. If you lose the booklet, I’ve also added the QR Code to this list.

Get the Homido Mini if you’re looking for the absolutely smallest possible virtual reality headset. Similar headsets include the Goggle Tech C1-Glass and the Baofeng Small Mojing.

The company behind it also makes a standard headset which is currently available on Amazon for $99. I haven’t ordered it yet to try it out because I’ve been reluctant to spend that much on a Google Cardboard set that cost as as much as the Samsung Gear VR — when the Gear VR is loaded with a lot more functionality.

maria@hypergridbusiness.com'

Maria Korolov

Maria Korolov is editor and publisher of Hypergrid Business. She has been a journalist for more than twenty years and has worked for the Chicago Tribune, Reuters, and Computerworld and has reported from over a dozen countries, including Russia and China.