5 top VR rollercoaster apps

I love virtual reality rollercoaster apps because they’re an easy way to show off the technology to people who’ve never tried it before.

You don’t have to teach people how to interact with the app, or how to navigate. All you do is pull it up and hand over the headset.

Otherwise, none of these apps are designed to be played multiple times. You ride it once or twice, and that’s about it.

1. Darkness Rollercoaster VR

Darkness Rollercoaster VR

Darkness Rollercoaster VR

This is a horror-themed rollercoaster with ghosts and monsters that come at you, kind of like a haunted house, but on rails. There are two paths to choose from, and the graphics are wonderful.

Get it for Android for $0.99.

2. Fibrum’s Roller Coaster VR Attraction

Fibrum Roller Coaster

Fibrum Roller Coaster

An extremely well-designed ride through a lost jungle temple. The developers went through more than 100 iterations, a company spokesman told me last year, and the app has been downloaded millions of times. This has long been my go-to roller coast demo app because of its fun ride, great graphics, and excellent sound effects.

Free for Android and iOS for first couple of rides, then there’s a small fee for more rides.

3. Cedar Point VR

Cedar Point VR

Cedar Point VR

Cedar Point’s Valravn roller coaster is billed as the tallest, longest and fastest roller coaster in the world. The virtual versionĀ is one of the first recreations I’ve seen of an actual existing roller coaster.

Free for Android and free for iOS.

4. Cmoar Roller Coaster VR

Cmoar Roller Coaster VR

Cmoar Roller Coaster VR

One of the older roller coaster apps, this coaster takes you across a desert landscape and through mining tunnels. Plus, there are flying dragons.

Get it for Android for $1.99 and for iOS for $2.99.

5. VR Kitchen Coaster

Kitchen Coaster VR

Kitchen Coaster VR

An unusual take on roller coasters, where the track takes you around a giant virtual cartoon kitchen. Or perhaps the kitchen is normal-sized, and you are just very small. Keep an eye out for the spider.

Free for Android.

 

 

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Maria Korolov

Maria Korolov is editor and publisher of Hypergrid Business. She has been a journalist for more than twenty years and has worked for the Chicago Tribune, Reuters, and Computerworld and has reported from over a dozen countries, including Russia and China.

  • I appreciate you are covering Google Cardboard style VR apps Maria… but for the virtual “real” deal try NoLimits2 available via Steam

    http://store.steampowered.com/app/301320/
    http://www.nolimitscoaster.com/

    It’s been working on the Oculus Rift DK2 with 0.8 runtime for some time and a beta version on Steam allows it to work now with Oculus Home 1.3 for DK2 and CV1. There is still a glitch in the current NoLimits2 2.2.4.2 Beta with the entry/menu/selection screen on CV1 (best to use the 2D monitor and mouse to select a coaster until that is fixed), but it runs fine in VR on both DK2 and CV1 once on the coaster.

    For some example coasters in NoLimits2 see http://blog.inf.ed.ac.uk/atate/2014/11/12/nolimits-roller-coasters-from-the-community/

  • Mustafa A.

    I used all of them. None of these can give me reality feel. Bad graphics and all of them too slow. So I didn’t feel inside.

    • The graphics and the speed don’t depend on the headset, but on the smartphone you’re using. The headset is just a box and a couple of lenses.

      If the current generation of smartphones isn’t doing it for you, the performance and the graphics quality is improving very rapidly due to the rapid competition in the market, while prices continue to drop.

      • Mustafa A.

        I did not say it depends on vr headset. And my phone can run twice these apps. Gpu clock speed is 384mhz.
        I’m saying again these apps just junk. They need to improve image quality and running speed. Thanks

        • I’m running them on a Samsung Galaxy S6, which has a GPU clock of 772, and I’m seeing no issues with lag. And the graphics are great, maybe due to the phone’s 577 pixels per inch.

          But I do have to agree with you that the VR app selection right now is pretty miserable. Mostly this is due to the fact that it’s still pretty much year zero for VR. Though at least I now had about a dozen roller coaster apps to compare. Last year, most of the roller coaster apps were simple 3D demos, without landscapes or anything else to make them interesting.