MakeHuman avatars now public domain

MakeHuman, a free, open source software project that creates mesh avatars, has switched to the least restrictive license possible for the avatars created with its product.

Content created with the software is licensed as CC0, which means that it can use used in any way, including commercial.

Avatars created with MakeHuman. (Image courtesy MakeHuman.)
Avatars created with MakeHuman. (Image courtesy MakeHuman.)

Previously, MakeHuman put some restrictions on how these models could be used, since they included base data to which MakeHuman holds the copyright.

“Unfortunately this led to some confusion about exactly what models could be used for, and certain popular sites even started to recommend against using MakeHuman models,” the company said in an announcement.

With the new license terms, there are no restrictions on how the avatars can be used.

So, if someone creates an avatar using the MakeHuman software, and brings it into OpenSim or Second Life, they can distribute it or sell it in any way they want, under any license terms or permissions they wan to attach to it. The original license text does not need to be included with, and there is no need to credit MakeHuman.

“Although it would be nice of you to do so,” the company said.

The same terms apply to any other content that is associated with the avatar, including snapshots of it, and its textures, hair and clothes.

In other recent news, the latest release of MakeHuman has a new morphing system — shown in the video above — new models from laser scans, new hair, better teeth, new clothes, new skins, and an improved ethnicity mixer.

For folks looking for help using MakeHuman, there’s a discussion on the OSgrid forums, on the Second Life forums, and on the MakeHuman forums.

(Thanks to Talla Adam for the heads up.)

Maria Korolov

Maria Korolov is a science fiction writer who covers cybersecurity, AI and extended reality as a tech journalist at her day job.
Check out her author page on Amazon or follow her on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. Her first virtual world novella, Krim Times, made the Amazon best-seller list in its category. Her second novella, The Lost King of Krim, is out now.